What is Fishing Bait?

There is such an assortment of bait that it is difficult to recommend any particular color, size, or type as the best. There are more than a thousand good baits on the market. All will catch fish at some time or another.

Fishing baits usually weigh from 1/4 to an ounce to three ounces. The most popular weight preferred by the majority of bait casters is the 5/8-ounce bait, while the average is between ½ and 3 quarters of an ounce. Baits can either be used as a whole or cut into chunks. Anglers can also use dead or live baits.

The Different Types of Bait

There is a wide array of organisms being used as fishing baits. Among the different types used in fishing, the commonly used are the small fishes. These consist of widely used fishing baits such as herring, anchovies, menhaden, and some others that are inborn to certain local waters. Larger fishes are usually used as chunk baits.

Fishing baits can be used whole, chunk, and strips, based on the activities of the type of fishes being chased. The size of the fishing bait is usually well matched with the size of the fish being hunted. Other common organisms used for bait fishing are crabs, worms, shrimps, crabs, clams, sand fleas, eels, and squid. Among all of the organisms mentioned, the crabs and the shrimps are the well-liked organisms to be used as fishing baits.

Shrimp are favorably used as fishing bait and are considered to be very valuable bait for a huge number of saltwater fish, especially those that are considered “inshore fish” like redfish, speckled trout, shook, and a lot more.

Whereas, various crab species, especially the fiddler crab, sand flea, and the blue crab, are perfect fishing baits for many varieties of “inshore fishes” and “bottom fish.” These crabs are usually clasped through their shell, usually on either the right or left of the head.

How to Acquire Fishing Bait?

Fishermen can acquire fishing bait either buying them in bait shops or simply by capturing it themselves.

The advantage of buying fishing bait is convenience, while catching live fishing bait is less expensive and can be more effective in luring fish. Digging for earthworms is another activity. Earthworms make an excellent bait.

Indeed, when it comes to bait fishing, using the proper fishing bait are important and imperative to the success of fishing. Hence, anglers should know the basics of choosing fishing baits in order to save time and money.

Nicky Pilkington

http://www.articlesbase.com/sports-and-fitness-articles/what-is-fishing-bait-11199.html

Comments

  1. The Waffle says:

    How do you get fishing bait to sink down further?
    I am a beginner at fishing, and I had trouble las time getting the fishing bait to sink more into the water; even with a weight, the bait would only sink down a few feet, whereas the fish inhabited lower waters and wouldn’t approach the surface. What is advised in this situation?

  2. Ron says:

    put a weight on the end of your line and have the bait about a foot above that with a 1 foot leader coming out the side, that will sink the weight…..heres alittle diagram below (the j is a hook)

    ROD
    |
    |
    |——j
    |
    |
    |
    WEIGHT
    References :
    ive been fishing for 6 years

  3. The Wormist says:

    other than having insufficient line to reach the bottom, l can’t possibly think of any reason your sinker can’t take the bait down.
    are you fishing in a river with a fast current? find a spot of slack water. deeper holes, wide spots or below current obstructions like wing dams or big rocks.
    References :

  4. Peter_AZ says:

    If you’re using a sliding sinker, you can have the sinker go down and not pull the bait down with it — you need to have the weight fixed to the line, either tied or pinched on. Then pay out enough line to let the bait go down. Sometimes you may be fishing in a current (in a river or the ocean) where you have to let out a few feet of line for every foot you want the bait to go down, so don’t be shy about letting out more line.

    If you’re doing all this and the bait still doesn’t go deep enough, you need a heavier sinker.
    References :

  5. andrewa says:

    use a heavier sinker obviously but a reverse dropper loop with a torpedo sinker goes down fast and deep
    References :
    i have been fishing since i was four i’m am a fishing addict

  6. Gus says:

    Depends what you are fishing for, but either more weight or heavier tackle is needed. Perhaps add a swivel to your bait if you are using Snell hooks.
    References :
    http://northern-pike-fishing.blogspot.com